Old SAT to New SAT Score Conversion Chart

October 25, 2021
By AdmissionSight

Old SAT to New SAT Score Conversion Chart

SAT scores are a critical part of the college admissions process. This standardized test is accepted by thousands of colleges and universities across the United States with the goal of comparing the performance of applicants in an objective and measurable way.

To gain a better understanding of how you need to score on the SAT, it’s crucial to understand what the test results mean. If you’ve done some research already, you’ve probably seen mention of “old” and “new” SAT scores.

Here, we’ll take a look at the difference along with a detailed old SAT to New SAT score conversion chart to clear up any confusion for applicants.

SAT Score to ACT Score Chart

Before we dive into the specifics of the old SAT to new SAT score conversion, let’s compare the current SAT scoring system with that of the ACT. This is a great way to see how your scores on either standardized test can impact your chances of getting into the college of your choice. Keep in mind that you have a choice between the ACT and SAT when applying to college.

SAT Total Score ACT Composite Score
1600 36
*1590 36
1580 36
1570 36
1560 35
1550 35
*1540 35
1530 35
1520 34
1510 34
*1500 34
1490 34
1480 33
1470 33
*1460 33
1450 33
1440 32
*1430 32
1420 32
1410 31
*1400 31
1390 31
1380 30
*1370 30
1360 30
1350 29
*1340 29
1330 29
1320 28
*1310 28
1300 28
1290 27
*1280 27
1270 27
1260 27
1250 26
*1240 26
1230 26
1220 25
*1210 25
1200 25
1190 24
*1180 24
1170 24
1160 24
1150 23
*1140 23
1130 23
1120 22
*1110 22
1100 22
1090 21
*1080 21
1070 21
1060 21
1050 20
*1040 20
1030 20
1020 19
*1010 19
1000 19
990 19
980 18
*970 18
960 18
950 17
940 17
*930 17
920 17
910 16
900 16
*890 16
880 16
870 15
860 15
*850 15
840 15
830 15
820 14
810 14
*800 14
790 14
780 14
770 13
*760 13
750 13
740 13
730 13
720 12
*710 12
700 12
690 12
680 11
*670 11
660 11
650 11
640 10
*630 10
620 10
610 9
600 9
*590 9

*This SAT score can be used when you need a single score point comparison.

How Has the SAT Scoring System Changed?

In early 2016, the College Board, the nonprofit behind the SAT exam, decided to make some major changes to the standardized test.

In the past, the SAT’s total score was 2400 with each individual section – Math, Writing, & Critical Reading – being out of 800. The new version of the SAT combines the Writing and Critical Reading section into a single part called Evidence-Based Reading and Writing.

There were also three Math sections in the origins SAT exam. These separate sections have also been combined into two Math portions. One section allows students to use a calculator while the other doesn’t. The idea behind this split was to see how students performed both with aid from a calculator and without.

Another major change at the time was making the essay section optional. In the past, it was a required portion of the SAT, and the score factored into a student’s Writing score. Now, it’s completely optional for high schoolers, and the score is provided separately. However, it’s still highly recommended for high schoolers since it’s just another way to stand out from other applicants.

All of these consolidations and removal of sections brought the total score of the SAT down to 1600. Naturally, many students want to know how old and new SAT scores convert. Whether you want to compare an older score within the newer scoring system or you need to update some outdated information online for your research.

Regardless, there are many reasons why you’d need an old SAT to new SAT score conversion chart. Instead of having to do the complicated math on your own, we’ve compiled an in-depth list comparing all of the possible old SAT scores with those of the new SAT. We’ve even thrown in corresponding ACT scores to take your research even further.

Old SAT to New SAT Score Conversion Chart

Old SAT Score

(600-2400)

New SAT Score

(400-1600)

ACT Composite Score
2400 1600 36
2390 1600 36
2380 1590 35
2370 1590 35
2360 1590 35
2350 1580 35
2340 1580 35
2330 1570 35
2320 1570 35
2310 1560 35
2300 1560 35
2290 1550 34
2280 1550 34
2270 1550 34
2260 1540 34
2250 1540 34
2240 1530 34
2230 1530 34
2220 1520 34
2210 1520 34
2200 1510 33
2190 1510 33
2180 1510 33
2170 1500 33
2160 1500 33
2150 1490 33
2140 1490 33
2130 1480 32
2120 1480 32
2110 1470 32
2100 1470 32
2090 1460 32
2080 1450 32
2070 1450 32
2060 1440 31
2050 1440 31
2040 1430 31
2030 1430 31
2020 1420 31
2010 1410 30
2000 1410 30
1990 1400 30
1980 1400 30
1970 1390 30
1960 1380 29
1950 1380 29
1940 1370 29
1930 1370 29
1920 1360 29
1910 1350 29
1900 1350 29
1890 1340 28
1880 1340 28
1870 1330 28
1860 1320 28
1850 1320 28
1840 1310 28
1830 1300 27
1820 1300 27
1810 1290 27
1800 1290 27
1790 1280 27
1780 1270 26
1770 1270 26
1760 1260 26
1750 1250 26
1740 1250 26
1730 1240 26
1720 1230 25
1710 1230 25
1700 1220 25
1690 1210 25
1680 1210 25
1670 1200 25
1660 1200 25
1650 1190 24
1640 1180 24
1630 1180 24
1620 1170 24
1610 1160 24
1600 1160 24
1590 1150 23
1580 1140 23
1570 1140 23
1560 1130 23
1550 1120 22
1540 1120 22
1530 1110 22
1520 1110 22
1510 1100 22
1500 1090 21
1490 1090 21
1480 1080 21
1470 1070 21
1460 1070 21
1450 1060 21
1440 1050 20
1430 1050 20
1420 1040 20
1410 1030 20
1400 1030 20
1390 1020 20
1380 1020 20
1370 1010 19
1360 1000 19
1350 1000 19
1340 990 19
1330 980 19
1320 980 19
1310 970 18
1300 960 18
1290 950 18
1280 950 18
1270 940 18
1260 930 17
1250 930 17
1240 920 17
1230 910 17
1220 910 17
1210 900 17
1200 890 16
1190 890 16
1180 880 16
1170 870 16
1160 870 16
1150 860 16
1140 850 15
1130 850 15
1120 840 15
1110 830 15
1100 830 15
1090 820 15
1080 810 15
1070 810 15
1060 800 14
1050 800 14
1040 790 14
1030 780 14
1020 780 14
1010 770 14
1000 760 14
990 760 14
980 750 13
970 740 13
960 740 13
950 730 13
940 730 13
930 720 13
920 710 12
910 710 12
900 700 12
890 690 12
880 690 12
870 680 12
860 670 12
850 660 12
840 650 12
830 640 12
820 630 12
810 620 11
800 610 11
790 600 11
780 590 11
770 580 11
760 560 11
750 550 NA*
740 540 NA*
730 530 NA*
720 520 NA*
710 510 NA*
700 500 NA*
690 490 NA*
680 480 NA*
670 470 NA*
660 460 NA*
650 450 NA*
640 440 NA*
630 430 NA*
620 420 NA*
610 410 NA*
600 400 NA*

* There’s not enough information to provide a valid comparison for lower scores on the ACT with that of the SAT due to the scoring difference.

How to Use the Old SAT to New SAT Score Conversion Chart?

Not sure how to use the old SAT to new SAT score conversion chart? No problem. We’ll explain it real quick. The Old SAT Score section lists all possible test scores up until the scoring system was changed.

The New SAT Score column does the same but with scores on the new scoring system. You can use the corresponding numbers from each list to compare and contrast older and newer SAT scores.

The ACT section is provided to help students get a better idea for how both the new and old SAT scoring system compare with the ACT.

How Does My SAT Score Impact My College Application?

Colleges and universities throughout the country have been considering standardized test scores as an integral part of the admissions process for decades. Although many schools temporarily stopped requiring the SAT & ACT for the Class of 2021-2022 due to COVID-19 complications, many are resuming the requirement.

As with any application requirement, the SAT plays a significant role in the final decision of whether or not you’re accepted. While it’s true college admissions officers take a holistic approach – meaning they take a wide variety of factors into account – your SAT score is definitely a major component.

Student thinking inside a room with a laptop.

As long as everything else on your application is strong, the higher your SAT score, the better chances you have of getting accepted. The same applies in the opposite direction. The lower your SAT score, the lower your odds of getting admitted. That’s why it’s critical for high schoolers to score as high as possible on the SAT exam.

What’s a Good SAT Score for College?

Overall, an SAT score higher than the 50th percentile – which is the median score – can be viewed as a decent score. In a real sense, this means you’ve outperformed the majority of high schoolers taking the exam. It might sound good to you, but the question is whether or not admissions officers will see it that way.

Most selective colleges won’t see an SAT score close to the 50th percentile as good. Naturally, the more competitive the school, the higher score you’ll need to get considered. The standard for what’s viewed as “good” increases the more selective the school. For example, Ivy League schools have higher expectations for SAT scores than standard public colleges.

Instead of aiming for the 50th percentile, it’s a good idea to set your sights a bit higher to the 75th percentile. This would come out to be 1200 or higher. According to our old SAT to new SAT score conversion chart, that would be 1660 to 1670 on the previous SAT scoring method. No matter which college or university you’re applying to, this would be viewed as a good score.

How to Improve Your SAT Score

1. Start preparing early.

A key strategy to maximizing your SAT score is to start preparing early. Generally, the latest you can take the exam in the fall semester of your senior year as college application deadlines come soon after. While you technically have up until that point to prepare for the SAT, we advise students to take the test earlier.

Ideally, high schoolers can take the SAT for the first time during their sophomore year and once again during their junior year. This gives you two opportunities to get your desired score while still having an additional opportunity your senior year if you need it. In this timeline, you’d have to start preparing for the SAT at least at the beginning of your freshman year.

Male student studying in the library.

The more preparation you have before the SAT, the better chance you have of scoring in that coveted 75th-percentile.

2. Practice with previously administered tests.

Preparing for the SAT requires a multi-faceted approach that focuses on a wide range of elements including the material on the exam, the subjects covered, and the time limit provided among other factors. But no preparation would be complete without exploring some content from previous exams.

That’s right! There are official SAT exams that have been previously administered available for students to practice with. These exams give you an accurate idea of what you can expect to see on the SAT while giving you the perfect opportunity to have a practice run at taking the exam with a time limit.

These published SAT exams can be found online or in some published books. There are also plenty of sample tests and example questions that resemble what’s found in the SAT without having actually been published in the past. These are also helpful.

3. Take the test more than once.

It might come as a surprise to you, but there’s no limit to the number of times you can take the SAT. The same is true for the ACT too. Before you start planning to take the SAT over and over and over again until you end up with a satisfactory score, there are some important caveats to take into consideration.

First and foremost, there’s a non-refundable fee for the SAT that’s due every time you take the exam. It might not sound like a lot for a single exam, but it quickly adds up over time the more you take it.

Another reason to avoid taking the SAT too many times is that it looks bad on your application. Admission officers see too many attempts as a sign that you’re underprepared.

Three students answering a test in their desks.

But these caveats don’t mean there’s not a sweet spot to be found when trying to optimize your score by taking the SAT more than once. We typically advise students to only take the test three to four times. This gives you three to four times to maximize your score without reflecting poorly on your application.

4. Work with a college entrance expert.

One of the most effective ways to optimize your SAT score is to work with a highly experienced college entrance expert like AdmissionSight. For years, we’ve been helping students successfully prepare for standardized tests with the end goal of improving their application overall.

We’re well-versed in SAT exams, what the College Board puts on their tests, and how you can improve your ability to take the SAT. We’ll help you gain a better understanding of what to expect on the test and give you the tools you need to tackle the material without any issues. If you’re interested in SAT and ACT tutoring, AdmissionSight can help!

Need a Hand Getting Into Your Dream School?

It’s common for high schoolers to feel stressed, confused, and even a bit scared about the college application process. After all, you’ve worked for years to get to this point with a lot riding on your efforts. But how can you make sure you have the best chance of getting accepted into your dream college? By working with a college entrance expert, of course!

AdmissionSight is a college admission specialist with over a decade of experience helping students just like you put their best foot forward when applying to college. We have a proven track record of success with 75% of the students we work with getting accepted into a Top 10 University or Ivy League school. How do we do it?

We offer a wide range of services designed to help students improve all aspects of their application to greatly increase their chances of getting admitted. For example, we help students choose the best high school courses, select the ideal extracurricular activities, write excellent college essays, and much, much more.

We’ve already helped hundreds of students get accepted into the school of their dreams, and we’d love to do the same for you. Feel free to contact us to set up a free consultation. We’ll be happy to answer all of your questions and explain how we can help you achieve your goals.

 

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