fbpx

UCLA Waitlist Acceptance Rate

By Eric Eng

By Eric Eng

Three students reading a letter while walking.

UCLA Waitlist Acceptance Rate

The acceptance rate from the waitlist at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) varies from year to year and is influenced by a number of factors. The UCLA waitlist acceptance rate can be influenced by the number of applicants, the number of spots available, and the strength of the waitlist pool. As a result, it is difficult to predict the waitlist acceptance rate for any given year with certainty.

However, in general, the UCLA waitlist acceptance rate is relatively low, as the university is one of the most selective public institutions in the country. The competition for spots on the waitlist is intense, and only a small percentage of students are offered admission from the waitlist each year.

What is a Waitlist?

What is a waitlist? Students who have applied to attend a college or university but were not accepted via the standard admission process are sometimes placed on a waitlist. This indicates that the school wants to accept the student, but they did not have enough spots in their initial round of acceptances.

When a college receives more applications than it has spots available, it may put some applicants on a waitlist and give them the option of remaining on the list in the hopes of being admitted. If a college receives more applications than it has spots available, it may also offer applicants the option of remaining on the list.

Female student sitting on a table and smiling at the camera.

If you are placed on a waitlist for a college, it indicates that admittance to the institution is not guaranteed; yet, it also indicates that you have not been completely rejected.

Students who are placed on a waitlist are normally required to declare whether or not they are interested in remaining on the list. If they agree to do so, they are then provided with information regarding the actions they must take as well as their odds of getting admitted from the waitlist.

Students who are placed on a waitlist are placed in limbo, and they do not know if they will be admitted to the school. This can be stressful for many students, which is why you want to have at least one backup school.

This may be a very frustrating and difficult process. However, if the college has a lower yield rate (the percentage of accepted students who decide to enroll) than anticipated or if spots become available for other reasons, the college may admit some students from the waitlist. This is especially true if the college has a lower yield rate than expected.

If you are currently on a waitlist for a college, it is in your best interest to maintain communication with the college and keep them apprised of any new developments regarding your academic or extracurricular accomplishments. Because there is no assurance that you will be accepted from the waitlist, you should also make sure that you have a backup plan in place before applying.

What Percentage of Waitlisted Students get Accepted at UCLA?

What percentage of waitlisted students get accepted at UCLA? The University of California, Los Angeles is not only the most prestigious public university in the United States but also the crown jewel of the University of California (UC) System.

The University of California, Los Angeles received an astounding 108,877 applications for admission to the class of 2025; nevertheless, only 15,602 were selected, which results in an acceptance percentage of 14.3%.

It is difficult to make an accurate prediction regarding the exact UCLA waitlist acceptance rate each year because this figure will fluctuate depending on a number of factors such as the number of applicants, the number of spots available, and the competitiveness of the waitlist pool. However, it is important to note that the percentage of waitlisted students who will be accepted has increased in recent years.

three students hanging out in a corridor

Due to the fact that UCLA has very high admissions standards, the percentage of students who are accepted off the waitlist is generally quite low.

The level of competition for spaces on the waitlist is exceptionally high, and only a limited number of applicants are awarded admission from the waitlist every year.

According to currently available data, the UCLA waitlist acceptance rate has fluctuated between the low single digits and approximately 20% throughout the course of the past few years.

The acceptance rate from the waitlist is not the same as the overall acceptance rate; nonetheless, these percentages might change from year to year. At most schools, the acceptance rate from the waitlist will be higher than the general acceptance rate, but this is not always the case.

In 2019, 13% of students who were placed on waitlists to attend UCLA were eventually admitted. The waitlist admission rate at UCLA increased to 19% in 2020, which was similar to many other highly selective universities.

These universities need to fill the spots from students who were admitted but chose another school. This is where the waitlist comes in. While UCLA might be your first choice, it might be another student’s second choice. If they get into their first choice, a spot at UCLA can open up for you.

The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) offered 15,242 waitlist spaces for the class of 2026, but it only admitted 214 students. This put the UCLA waitlist acceptance rate at a historic low of 2%.

If you are on the waitlist for admission to UCLA, it is imperative to know that receiving an offer of admission is not assured, and the only way to increase your chances of getting accepted is to continue to pursue your interests and achievements while maintaining high grades.

Is a Waitlist a Soft Rejection?

Is a waitlist a soft rejection? It is possible to view being placed on a waitlist as a “soft rejection” because you have not been definitively accepted to a college or university. But you also have not been definitively rejected either.

When a college receives more applications than it has spots available, it may put some applicants on a waitlist and give them the option of remaining on the list in the hopes of being admitted if spots open up later. If a college receives more applications than it has spots available, it may also offer applicants the option of remaining on the list.

Young woman walking in the campus.

Even though admission to the college is not guaranteed, there is still a possibility that you will be offered a spot if the college has a lower yield rate (the percentage of admitted students who decide to enroll) than was anticipated or if spots become available for other reasons. Both of these scenarios are possible.

It is essential to keep in mind that the waitlist process can be annoying and unclear, and that simply being on the waitlist does not guarantee that one will be admitted.

On the other hand, this may be interpreted as a sign of the college’s interest in admitting and confidence in your ability to contribute to the student body.

You are not definitively denied when you are placed on a waitlist; yet, this does not mean that you will be admitted to the program either. In conclusion, being placed on a waitlist is not the same thing as a soft rejection. It is a one-of-a-kind circumstance that is fraught with a degree of ambiguity, but given the cutthroat nature of the college Do Waitlisted Students Usually get Accepted?, it is not unheard of.

Do waitlisted students usually get accepted? It is dependent on a number of criteria, including the total number of applicants, the total number of available spaces, and the quality of the waitlist pool, as to whether or not students who have been placed on a waitlist are eventually accepted to a college or university.

In general, the acceptance rate from the waitlist is subject to significant variation both from one academic year to the next and from one institution to another.

Some universities have a track record of accepting a sizeable number of students from the waitlist, while others have a history of admitting a very small number of applicants. In any given year, a specific college may only admit a limited number of students from the waitlist, whereas other colleges may admit a larger percentage of students from the waitlist.

The acceptance rate from the waitlist can also be affected by other factors, such as the yield rate, which is the proportion of accepted students who go on to enroll in the program, as well as any modifications made to the enrollment or financial assistance status.

The National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) found that twenty percent of all students who opted to remain on waitlists were ultimately admitted. On the other hand, the average was far lower at selective universities, where only 7% of candidates who accepted waitlist slots were ultimately granted admission.

It is essential to keep in mind that being placed on a waitlist does not automatically guarantee that one will be admitted and that the process of waiting on a waitlist can be both unclear and irritating.

If you are currently on the college’s waitlist, it is a good idea to keep in touch with the college and inform them of any updates to your academic or extracurricular achievements. However, you should also make sure that you have a backup plan in place just in case you are not removed from the waitlist.

In conclusion, although there is a possibility that some waitlisted students will be accepted into a college, this is not a guarantee, and the likelihood of this happening varies substantially both from year to year and from school to school. It is essential to approach the waitlist process with expectations that are in line with reality and to have a fallback strategy ready to go.

Want to learn more about the UCLA waitlist acceptance rate and your chances of getting into the University of California, Los Angeles? You’ve come to the right place. At AdmissionSight, we have over 10 years of experience guiding students through the competitive admissions process.

AdmissionSight can help you put your best foot forward when applying to college this fall. Contact us today to set up your free consultation.

Search
College Admissions

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Sign up now to receive insights on
how to navigate the college admissions process.