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The Ultimate Guide to Acing the AP Latin Exam

By Eric Eng

By Eric Eng

a male student smiling at the camera while holding his books

The Ultimate Guide to Acing the AP Latin Exam

AP Exams are administered among high school students in preparation for college. The topics covered in these exams mirror what’s taught in the related AP Courses. The College Board sets the standard for what both the courses and associated exams will include. There are 38 available AP Courses overall. Perhaps the most interesting of the bunch is the AP Latin Exam. Given the specificity of the subject, there’s no question that this AP Course and Exam isn’t the most popular option students have. However, due in part to its practicality in understanding foreign languages and even English, the AP Latin Exam still sees a consistent stream of participants. The test has been administered every year since its genesis in 1956. Roughly, the exam sees 6,500 students enroll each year. Although the AP Latin Exam used to be composed of two parts, it’s been condensed into one course since 2013. Since Latin places a heavy focus on memorization, this AP Exam is well suited for self-studiers who wish to take the exam without taking the AP Latin Course. In this guide, the AdmissionSight team will address students’ most common questions about the AP Latin Exam to give you the best chance of succeeding.

Carved Latin words

What is the AP Latin Exam?

The AP Latin Exam is an advanced placement exam the College Board offers. It is designed to assess students’ Latin proficiency and ability to comprehend and interpret Latin literature. Latin, an ancient language with a rich history, has been widely studied for centuries. The AP Latin Exam allows students to showcase their knowledge and skills in this classical language.

Why is the AP Latin Exam important?

The AP Latin Exam is significant for students passionate about Latin and classics. It allows you to showcase your skills and knowledge in the subject and earn college credit or advanced placement in your future studies.

Latin, the language of ancient Rome, has a rich history and is considered the foundation of many modern Romance languages. Studying Latin provides a deep understanding of the language itself and offers insights into the culture, literature, and history of the ancient world.

By taking the AP Latin Exam, you can demonstrate your proficiency in Latin grammar, vocabulary, and translation. The exam assesses your ability to read and analyze Latin texts, including prose and poetry, from various authors such as Caesar, Vergil, and Ovid.

Performing well on the AP Latin Exam showcases your dedication to the subject and enhances your college application. Admissions officers recognize the rigor of the AP Latin curriculum and the commitment required to excel in the exam. Your achievement in this challenging course can set you apart from other applicants and demonstrate your intellectual curiosity and academic prowess.

Furthermore, earning college credit through the AP Latin Exam can save you time and money in the long run. Many colleges and universities grant credit or advanced placement to students who achieve a certain score on the exam. This means that you may be able to bypass introductory Latin courses in college and delve straight into more advanced coursework. Not only does this accelerate your academic progress, but it also frees up space in your schedule to explore other subjects or pursue additional interests.

Moreover, the AP Latin Exam provides a valuable opportunity for personal growth and intellectual development. The rigorous preparation required for the exam cultivates critical thinking skills, attention to detail, and the ability to analyze complex texts. These skills are not only applicable to the study of Latin but also transferable to other academic disciplines and real-life situations.

The AP Latin Exam is not just a test of your Latin proficiency; it is a gateway to a deeper understanding of the language, culture, and literature of ancient Rome. It offers numerous benefits, including the potential to earn college credit, enhance your college application, and develop valuable skills. So, embrace the challenge, immerse yourself in the world of Latin, and let the AP Latin Exam be a stepping stone towards your academic and intellectual success.

How long is the AP Latin Exam?

The exam consists of two main sections: the multiple-choice and free-response sections. These sections are carefully crafted to evaluate different aspects of a student’s Latin proficiency.

The AP Latin Exam is a 3-hour long exam:

  1. Multiple Choice Section:
    • 50 questions
    • 1 hour
    • Accounts for 50% of the total exam score
    • Includes questions on syllabus and sight readings, and requires students to demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary, syntax, and comprehension of passages in Latin texts.
  2. Free Response Section:
    • 5 questions
    • 2 hours, including a 15-minute reading period
    • Accounts for the remaining 50% of the total exam score
    • Includes translation questions and analytical essays.

The free-response section includes translation, analysis, and interpretation of the Latin text from the syllabus, with specific question formats such as translation, short essays, and analytical essays.

How hard is the AP Latin Exam?

The difficulty of the AP Latin Exam can vary depending on your level of preparation and familiarity with Latin literature. While it is considered a challenging exam, it is conquerable with proper study and practice.

It is important to note that the exam assesses your reading, translating, and analytical skills, so a strong foundation in Latin grammar and vocabulary is crucial. It also helps to have exposure to different works of Latin literature.

Regarding the AP Latin Exam, the difficulty lies not only in the content but also in the time constraints. The exam consists of two sections: the multiple-choice section and the free-response section. The multiple-choice section tests your ability to comprehend and analyze Latin passages, while the free-response section requires you to translate and analyze specific passages from Latin literature.

One of the challenges of the exam is the need for speed. You are given a limited amount of time to answer each question, which means you must be able to read and understand the Latin text quickly. This requires a solid grasp of Latin grammar and vocabulary and the ability to decipher complex sentence structures and identify literary devices.

Another aspect that adds to the difficulty of the exam is the range of Latin literature that can be covered. The exam may include passages from various genres, such as poetry, prose, or historical texts. This means that you need to be well-versed in different literary styles and be able to adapt your translation and analysis skills accordingly.

Furthermore, the exam often includes passages from well-known Latin authors, such as Virgil, Cicero, or Ovid. These authors are known for their intricate language use and deep exploration of themes. To succeed on the exam, you must not only be familiar with their works but also be able to analyze and interpret their writing in a meaningful way.

Preparing for the AP Latin Exam requires dedication and consistent practice. Reading and translating Latin texts regularly is recommended, as this will help you build your vocabulary and improve your comprehension skills. Additionally, working through practice exams and sample questions can familiarize you with the format and style of the exam, allowing you to develop effective strategies for approaching different types of questions.

While the AP Latin Exam may be challenging, it is important to remember that it is designed to assess your skills and knowledge in Latin. With the right preparation and a solid understanding of Latin grammar and literature, you can confidently tackle the exam and showcase your abilities.

What factors affect the difficulty of the exam?

Several factors can influence the perceived difficulty of the AP Latin Exam. One factor is the types of passages selected for the exam. Some passages may be more complex or unfamiliar, making them more challenging to analyze and translate.

When selecting passages for the exam, the College Board aims to provide a diverse range of texts representing different genres, periods, and authors. This ensures that students are exposed to a variety of linguistic and literary styles. The passages may include excerpts from famous works of Roman literature, such as Virgil’s Aeneid or Cicero’s speeches, as well as lesser-known texts highlighting different aspects of Latin language and culture.

Furthermore, the passages may vary in terms of their thematic content. Some passages focus on historical events, while others delve into philosophical or mythological themes. The inclusion of different themes adds an extra layer of complexity to the exam, as students must not only demonstrate their language skills but also their ability to comprehend and analyze the underlying ideas and messages conveyed in the texts.

Another factor that contributes to the difficulty of the exam is your own level of preparation. The more time and effort you invest in studying and practicing Latin, the more confident and well-equipped you will be to tackle the exam.

Preparing for the AP Latin Exam involves memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules and developing strong reading and comprehension skills. This includes practicing the art of close reading, where you carefully analyze the structure, syntax, and word choices in the passages. By engaging in extensive reading of Latin texts, both in and out of the classroom, you can enhance your ability to decipher complex sentences and understand the nuances of Latin literature.

Furthermore, practicing translation exercises and participating in mock exams can help you become familiar with the questions and tasks you will encounter on the exam. This allows you to develop effective strategies for time management and problem-solving, which are crucial for success.

Lastly, individual challenges and strengths can impact the difficulty level. For example, if you struggle with certain aspects of Latin grammar or have difficulty interpreting poetry, these areas may pose greater challenges during the exam.

It is important to identify your weaknesses and work on them diligently. Seeking guidance from your Latin teacher or joining study groups can provide valuable support and resources to help you overcome these challenges. By addressing your weaknesses head-on, you can build a solid foundation and improve your overall performance on the exam.

On the other hand, recognizing and leveraging your strengths can also contribute to your success. If you have a natural affinity for analyzing syntax or a deep understanding of Roman history and culture, you can utilize these strengths to your advantage during the exam. By capitalizing on your areas of expertise, you can showcase your knowledge and skills, potentially earning extra points.

In conclusion, the difficulty of the AP Latin Exam is influenced by various factors. The selection of passages, your level of preparation, and your individual challenges and strengths all play a role in determining the perceived difficulty. By understanding these factors and taking proactive steps to address them, you can enhance your chances of achieving a favorable outcome on the exam.

What is on the AP Latin Exam?

Since the AP Courses directly inform the skills, concepts, and topics found on the AP Exam, it’s essential to understand the curriculum. This is especially true for students who opt to take the AP Latin Exam without taking the course. The course seeks to provide high school students with a comprehensive and rich Latin curriculum. The required knowledge level of the subject is equivalent to a higher-level intermediate college course. Typically, students approach this type of course towards the end of their second year or at the beginning of their third year of high school. The AP Latin Exam will require students to know how to read, analyze, translate, and understand Latin prose and poetry.

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The AP Latin Exam mirrors AP Foreign Language Exams to the same extent that Latin resembles commonly spoken foreign languages. In other words, the general ability to comprehend the language in its basic properties reflects that Latin is essentially a dead language. You won’t be required to speak or understand spoken Latin on the exam as in other foreign language tests. Instead, you’ll be assessed on your ability to handle the language regarding reading, translation, and general understanding.

In the past, the AP Latin Course combined two different study genres. Namely, students either engaged with Latin prose or poetry. This structure was later amended and combined into a single course. The current AP Latin Exam reflects that synthesis. The test will assess your ability to understand the features of both of these genres. It’s the belief of the makers of the exam that the skill to do both is indicative of a strong student. As a result, you’ll notice that the required reading syllabus for the AP Latin Exam includes both prose and poetry works since the test will reflect such.

Today, the AP Latin Exam covers various topics, including various genres of Latin literature. Expect to encounter passages from notable authors such as Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil.

The exam evaluates your ability to translate Latin passages accurately, analyze literary devices, and understand the historical and cultural context of the texts. It also tests your comprehension of Latin grammar and syntax.

When it comes to translating Latin passages, the exam assesses your proficiency in understanding the nuances of the language. You will be challenged to accurately render the original text’s meaning into English, paying attention to the subtleties of word choice and sentence structure.

Furthermore, the exam requires you to analyze the literary devices the authors employ. This includes identifying and interpreting figures of speech, such as metaphors, similes, and hyperboles. By examining these devices, you gain a deeper understanding of the author’s intended meaning and impact on the text.

Understanding the historical and cultural context of the texts is crucial for a comprehensive analysis. The exam may ask you to explain how the events or themes in the passage relate to the broader historical or social context of ancient Rome. This requires you to have a solid understanding of Roman history, politics, and culture.

In addition to translation and analysis, the AP Latin Exam tests your Latin grammar and syntax knowledge. You will be expected to demonstrate a mastery of verb conjugations, noun declensions, and sentence structure. This includes recognizing and applying various grammatical constructions, such as participles, gerunds, and subjunctive clauses.

Preparing for the AP Latin Exam involves not only studying the works of Caesar, Cicero, and Vergil but also immersing yourself in the rich tapestry of Roman literature. Familiarize yourself with other influential authors, such as Ovid, Livy, and Horace, as their works may also appear on the exam.

Furthermore, it is essential to develop strong reading comprehension skills in Latin. Practice reading and translating Latin passages regularly to improve your speed and accuracy. Additionally, engage with secondary sources and commentaries to deepen your understanding of the texts and their historical context.

Multiple-Choice Section

The multiple-choice section of the AP Latin Exam consists of 50 questions that must be completed in one hour and account for 50% of the total exam score. 

The section includes questions on syllabus readings, and sight readings, and requires students to demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary, syntax, and comprehension of passages in Latin texts. The multiple-choice section is divided into four types of questions, including 10-12 questions on syllabus reading: Vergil, 10-12 questions on syllabus reading: Caesar, 13-15 questions on sight reading: poetry, and 13-15 questions on sight reading: prose.

Students will be asked to demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary, explain the meaning of Latin words and phrases in context, use specific terminology to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures, demonstrate knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts, scan dactylic hexameter in Latin poetry, identify stylistic features in Latin poetry and prose, identify references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in Latin texts, and demonstrate overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

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Tackling the multiple-choice section

To tackle the multiple-choice section of the AP Latin Exam, students should follow these tips:

  1. Review the syllabus readings and sight readings: The multiple-choice section includes questions on both syllabus readings and sight readings. Students should review the texts covered in the course and practice reading and comprehending Latin texts.
  2. Practice answering multiple-choice questions: Students should practice answering different types of multiple-choice questions, including those on vocabulary, syntax, and comprehension of passages in Latin texts. The College Board provides sample questions on its website, and students can also find additional practice questions from other sources.
  3. Understand the question format: The multiple-choice section is divided into four types of questions, including 10-12 questions on syllabus reading: Vergil, 10-12 questions on syllabus reading: Caesar, 13-15 questions on sight reading: poetry, and 13-15 questions on sight reading: prose. Students should understand the format of each question type and practice answering them accordingly.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of Latin vocabulary and syntax: Students should be able to identify grammatical forms and syntactic structures, explain the meaning of Latin words and phrases in context, and demonstrate knowledge of Latin syntax to read and comprehend Latin texts.
  5. Scan dactylic hexameter in Latin poetry: Students should practice scanning dactylic hexameter to identify stylistic features in Latin poetry and prose.
  6. Identify references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in Latin texts: Students should be able to identify references to Roman culture, history, and mythology in Latin texts and demonstrate overall comprehension of passages in Latin texts.

Free-response Section

The free-response section of the AP Latin Exam consists of five questions that must be completed in two hours, including a 15-minute reading period, and accounts for 50% of the total exam score. The section includes translation questions and analytical essays. The format of the free-response section is as follows:

  1. Question 1: A 10-minute translation of a passage from the syllabus reading: Vergil.
  2. Question 2: A 10-minute translation of a passage from the syllabus reading: Caesar.
  3. Question 3: A 45-minute long essay. The essay requires students to analyze and interpret a passage from the syllabus reading: Vergil or Caesar and demonstrate their understanding of Latin literary concepts, including literary devices, themes, and motifs.
  4. Question 4: A 20-minute short essay. The essay requires students to analyze and interpret a passage from the syllabus reading: Vergil or Caesar and demonstrate their understanding of Latin literary concepts, including literary devices, themes, and motifs.
  5. Question 5: A 20-minute short essay based on the entire Aeneid (Latin selections and parts read in English). The essay requires students to analyze and interpret the Aeneid and demonstrate their understanding of Latin literary concepts, including literary devices, themes, and motifs.

Students are expected to demonstrate their ability to translate Latin texts into English, analyze and interpret Latin texts, and demonstrate their understanding of Latin literary concepts. 

Tackling the free-response section

To tackle the free-response section of the AP Latin Exam, students can follow these strategies based on the provided search results:

  1. Read each free-response question carefully: Carefully read and understand each free-response question to ensure a clear understanding of what is being asked.
  2. Maximize points on multiple-part questions: Free-response questions often involve multiple parts, and it is essential to note that the parts are graded separately. If a student finds themselves struggling with a question, the best approach is to maximize points by answering the parts they are confident about.
  3. Share thought process: When answering free-response questions, it is beneficial to share the thought process. This can help demonstrate understanding even if the answer is not fully complete.
  4. Be clear and concise: Provide clear and concise responses to free-response questions. This helps ensure the answers are easily understood and effectively convey the intended meaning.
  5. Practice with past free-response questions: Review and answer previously administered free-response questions that date back several years. This allows students to familiarize themselves with the format and types of questions that may appear on the exam.
  6. Mimic test settings: Create a simulated AP Latin Exam environment to practice the free-response section. This can help students become comfortable with the time constraints and conditions of the actual exam.

Samples

Here are some samples from previous exams so you’d know what to expect:

samples from AP Latin exam samples from AP Latin exam samples from AP Latin exam samples from AP Latin exam samples from AP Latin exam

What materials should I be familiar with for the AP Latin Exam?

For a complete and updated list of the required reading for the AP Latin Exam and Course, visit the College Board site. Every year, the AP Latin Course focuses on the same selections from two classical works. This is critical for students and self-studiers alike as this can accurately indicate what will be on the AP Latin Exam. The poetry is always a selection from Aeneid by Publius Vergilius Maro, aka Vergil. The prose work is routinely Commentaries on the Gallic War by Julius Caesar. It’s essential to be familiar with these works for the AP Latin Exam and to be able to place them in a broader literary and historical context. While studying these works is important, it’s paramount that students don’t forget to study the structure, grammar, and other aspects of the language itself.

The Aeneid

What should I have before taking the AP Latin Exam?

Although there are technically no prerequisites for taking the AP Latin Exam, AdmissionSight does have some recommendations. Ideally, students will have taken and succeeded in the AP Latin Course. This is an excellent foundation that not only familiarizes students with the subject’s rigor but also gives them some idea of what will be found on the exam. However, the subject is conducive to self-studiers who opt to take the AP Latin Exam without taking the course. In this case, we recommend that you have sufficient proficiency in Latin to understand the required texts. For students, this might mean needing to have three or four years of study under your belt. While this varies from person to person, it’s critical to assess yourself and be honest about how prepared you are compared to what you’ll find on the exam.

AP Latin Exam Scoring Breakdown

The AP Latin Exam is a comprehensive assessment that evaluates your understanding of Latin language and literature. It consists of two sections, each contributing to your overall score. The multiple-choice section accounts for 50% of your score, while the free-response section accounts for 50%.

Within the multiple-choice section, you are presented with questions that test your knowledge of Latin grammar, vocabulary, and reading comprehension. This section requires you to carefully analyze passages from various Latin texts, including works by authors such as Virgil, Ovid, and Cicero. Each correct answer earns you points, and there is no penalty for incorrect responses. It is essential to approach these questions with a thorough understanding of Latin syntax and literary devices.

The free-response section of the AP Latin Exam allows you to showcase your mastery of the Latin language and your ability to engage with Latin literature. This section is divided into two parts: the translation section and the essay section.

In the translation section, you are presented with a Latin passage that you must accurately translate into English. Your translation is evaluated based on its accuracy, precision, and understanding of the original text. It is crucial to demonstrate your command of Latin grammar, vocabulary, and syntax in order to produce a faithful and nuanced translation.

The essay section of the free-response portion requires you to analyze and interpret a given Latin text. You are expected to provide insightful analysis, demonstrating your understanding of the author’s style, themes, and literary techniques. Crafting a well-structured essay that effectively supports your arguments is essential for earning points in this section. It is vital to provide evidence from the text to support your claims and to showcase your ability to engage with the nuances of Latin literature.

Overall, the AP Latin Exam is a rigorous assessment that evaluates your proficiency in Latin language and literature. By carefully preparing for the multiple-choice and free-response sections, you can demonstrate your mastery of the subject and earn a high score. Remember to practice translating Latin passages and analyzing Latin texts to strengthen your skills and enhance your performance on the exam.

Topics Covered in the AP Latin Exam

The AP Latin Exam covers a variety of topics, allowing you to showcase your knowledge and understanding of Latin literature. Some of the common themes and genres you may encounter include:

  • Epic poetry
  • Historical narratives
  • Philosophical treatises
  • Drama and theater
  • Love and relationships

It is essential to familiarize yourself with these topics and read a variety of works from different time periods to ensure a comprehensive understanding.

The course framework delivers a comprehensive and precise outline of the essential prerequisites for students to achieve success. It details the knowledge, skills, and comprehension students need, centered around course themes that encompass fundamental principles of the subject.

The AP Latin framework is structured into eight commonly taught study units, presenting a potential sequence for the course. As ever, you retain the freedom to arrange the course content as you see fit.

Unit
Unit 1: Vergil, Aeneid, Book 1
Unit 2: Caesar, Gallic War, Books 1 and 6
Unit 3: Vergil, Aeneid, Book 2
Unit 4: Caesar, Gallic War, Book 4
Unit 5: Vergil, Aeneid, Book 4
Unit 6: Caesar, Gallic War, Book 5, Part I
Unit 7: Caesar, Gallic War, Book 5, Part II, Book 6, and Book 7
Unit 8: Vergil, Aeneid, Books 6, 8, and 12

The course and exam description for AP Latin delineates specific skills for students to hone throughout the year. These skills are intended to facilitate their ability to think and behave like scholars specializing in classical studies.

Skill Description
1. Reading and Comprehension Read and comprehend Latin poetry and prose.
2. Translation Translate Latin texts into English.
3. Contextualization Relate Latin texts to Roman historical, cultural, and literary contexts.
4. Textual Analysis Analyze linguistic and literary features of Latin texts.
5. Argumentation Develop an argument that analyzes Latin poetry and/or prose.

How to study for the AP Latin Exam

Determine your skills – Before you can dive into the deep end of mastering the exam material, you have to get an accurate assessment of where your knowledge stands in relation to what’s being asked on the test. One of the most effective ways of judging this is by answering some sample questions or taking some preliminary sample tests. Think of this step as a diagnostic test that will determine what areas you need to study in more depth and which areas in which you’re strong. Without this initial information, you would essentially be studying blind and might end up missing a few blind spots that you have. In the end, this initial step in determining your skills will make it easier to study efficiently and targeted.

The AP Latin Course’s description on the College Board site includes some helpful sample test questions that offer a great launching point. In order to get an even deeper look into your current knowledge of Latin, you could answer some sample questions regarding Vergil’s Aeneid or others regarding Caesar’s Gallic War.

Study the material –  Now that you have an accurate assessment of where you stand, it’s time to tackle the AP Latin Exam’s material. The topics you study should reflect the curriculum of the AP Latin Course. Some of the primary skills that you should practice are the analysis of texts, contextualization, translation, reading, and comprehension.

a college student looking at her laptop

Unlike other AP Exams, it’s not easy to find high-quality study resources for the AP Latin Exam. While there are several relevant materials out there, only a few are made specifically to help students study for the exam. The two main study guides produced with the exam in mind would be Caesar’s Gallic War: A Fully Parsed Vocabulary Guide for the AP Latin Exam and Vergil’s Aeneid: A Fully Parsed Vocabulary Guide for the AP Latin Exam. You should be able to find more helpful sources online in the form of test questions, review sheets, or study guides that other AP teachers have posted. Here’s an entire database of helpful materials used on a high school course. We recommend students taking the AP Latin Exam also check out this website that features helpful vocabulary and grammar studying tools. It wasn’t designed specifically with the AP Latin Exam in mind, but it still has a lot of material that you’ll find on the exam.

Rehearse multiple-choice questions – When you feel like you’ve got a good grasp on the theory, it’s a good idea to start focusing on answering the various question formats you’ll find on the AP Latin Exam. Although multiple-choice questions are generally assumed to be easy to answer, you shouldn’t overlook the types you’ll find on this exam. Students can find 30 helpful sample questions on page 41 of the AP Latin Exam’s official course description. You can also find more multiple-choice questions and sample passages on this page. There are 50 multiple-choice questions on the AP Latin Exam. 20 of these focus on Caesar and Vergil selections while the remaining 30 revolve around sight readings.

Rehearse free-response questions – Hands down, the best way to prep for the final free-response section of the AP Latin Exam is to review and answer the countless previously administered free-response questions that date all the way back to 2013. All of these questions come along with real student answers and coring explanations. AdmissionSight recommends that students take this studying portion one year at a time and pay close attention to how the responses are graded. This is a helpful window into how you can expect your own answers to be graded.

Mimic test settings – The final stage of your preparation process would be creating your own AP Latin Exam. In other words, you can stage your own version of the real exam in order to get a better idea of how you’ll perform under test-like conditions. You need to put all of your studying materials away, including study guides, notes, flashcards, and your phone. Find a location that’s quiet where you won’t be interrupted for the three hours for which you’ll have to take your own preliminary AP Latin Exam. While it’s difficult to find a complete AP Latin Exam online, you should be able to piece your own together or find one in a commercial study guide. Try your best to make the settings of your practice test as realistic as possible. This will probably give you the most accurate idea of how you’ll perform on test day.

Tips on the day of the exam

The day of the AP Latin Exam can be nerve-wracking, but with these tips, you can approach it with confidence:

  • Arrive Early: Give yourself plenty of time to arrive at the exam location, ensuring you are calm and prepared.
  • Read Carefully: Pay close attention to the instructions and passages. Make sure you understand what is being asked before proceeding.
  • Manage Your Time: Pace yourself during the exam to ensure that you have enough time to complete all sections. Divide your time wisely between the multiple-choice and free-response sections.
  • Answer Every Question: Even if you are unsure of an answer, it is better to make an educated guess than to leave it unanswered.
  • Stay Calm and Focused: Take deep breaths and maintain your composure throughout the exam. Remember all the hard work you put into preparing, and trust your abilities.

When is the AP Latin Exam in 2024?

The AP Latin Exam in 2024 is scheduled to take place on Friday, May 17, in the afternoon. Students should verify the exact start/report time with their school, as exams can begin up to one hour after the official start time.

For a complete list of the 2024 AP Exam dates, here’s a full list:

Week 1 Morning 8 a.m.

Local Time

Afternoon 12 p.m.

Local Time

Monday,

May 6, 2024

United States Government and Politics Art History

Chemistry

Tuesday,

May 7, 2024

Human Geography

Microeconomics

Seminar

Statistics

Wednesday,

May 8, 2024

English Literature and Composition Comparative Government and Politics

Computer Science A

Thursday,

May 9, 2024

Chinese Language and Culture

Environmental Science

Psychology
Friday,

May 10, 2024

European History

United States History

Macroeconomics

Spanish Literature and Culture

Art and Design: Friday, May 10, 2024 (8 p.m. ET), is the deadline for AP Art and Design students to submit their three portfolio components as final in the AP Digital Portfolio.
Week 2 Morning 8 a.m.

Local Time

Afternoon 12 p.m.

Local Time

Afternoon 2 p.m.

Local Time

Monday,

May 13, 2024

Calculus AB

Calculus BC

Italian Language and Culture

Precalculus

Tuesday,

May 14, 2024

English Language and Composition African American Studies

Physics C: Mechanics

Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism
Wednesday,

May 15, 2024

French Language and Culture

World History: Modern

Computer Science Principles

Music Theory

Thursday,

May 16, 2024

Spanish Language and Culture Biology

Japanese Language and Culture

Friday,

May 17, 2024

German Language and Culture

Physics 1: Algebra-Based

Latin

Physics 2: Algebra-Based

When do AP scores come out?

AP scores are typically released in early to mid-July of the year the exams were taken. The exact release date may vary slightly from year to year, but students who took their AP exams in May can generally expect their scores to become available.

You can check for updates on the College Board’s official AP scores website if you are waiting for your AP scores. They will also email you when your scores are added to your score report. If you haven’t received your scores by mid-August, contacting AP Services for Students is recommended for assistance.

Post-exam tips

After completing the AP Latin Exam, take some time to relax and reflect on your performance. Regardless of the outcome, congratulate yourself for your dedication and effort.

If you are unsatisfied with your performance, use it as a learning experience. Identify areas where you can improve and consider retaking the exam if desired.

Additionally, reach out to your Latin teacher or mentor for feedback and guidance on areas that need strengthening. They can provide valuable insights and recommendations for further study.

The AP Latin Exam is a challenging yet rewarding opportunity for students passionate about Latin. By understanding the exam’s format and content, honing your language and analysis skills, and employing effective study strategies, you can excel on this exam and showcase your dedication to the Latin language and its timeless literature. Good luck!

 AdmissionSight can help you prepare

AdmissionSight has earned a reputation for supporting students in the pursuit of their academic goals, no matter how lofty. In fact, we encourage students to think large and beyond the self-inflicted barriers by which too many students limit themselves. If we’ve learned anything from the decades we’ve helped students find their way into some of the best higher learning institutions in the world, it’s that the average student is capable of more than they might believe. Whether you’re hoping to find the perfect summer program, participate in the best extracurricular, or ace your placement exams, we have the resources and expertise to help students achieve more with their college admissions. If you’d like to learn more about what we do and how we can help, feel free to contact us for a free consultation.

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